Internal Chaos Control

Internal Chaos Control


It has almost been a year since LevelTen decided to go agile and implement the Scrum process to tackle development and marketing related projects. Throughout the learning process we have made some slight alterations tailored to fit LevelTen’s needs. Most recently, we have introduced an “Internal Scrum” to keep track of the never ending tasks that need to be taken care of around the office – fixing IT equipment, documenting processes, documenting software, office organization, decorating, etc. As an Administrative Assistant at LevelTen I don’t do a ton of marketing or development work, I simply do a little of everything. A lot of what I do seems not so important in comparison to client related tasks but in reality all of these things have to be done in order to keep the ball rolling at any company. I thought that implementing an “Internal Scrum” would be a great way to make everything that needs to be done visible and to prioritize and delegate tasks to the team. It’s only been 3 weeks since we first introduced our “Internal Scrum” and I must say I really like it. All of the less important tasks that typically get swept under the rug and pushed back to a later date are getting done. And it’s fun! Typically, the Scrum process is used in software development so at times it can get a little too technical for daily to-do’s but with a few tweaks, you can use the process for whatever you want. For the most part, we run our “Internal Scrum” the same way the development and marketing Scrums are run. At LevelTen all of our Sprints run alongside each other, working in 2 week long Sprints. At the start of a Sprint the entire team meets to plan, prioritize and commit to tasks. Each day we meet for a quick 15 minute recap and evaluate what was done since the last daily scrum and what is going to be done before the next daily scrum. At the end of the Sprint we meet for the Sprint Review and Sprint Retrospective to evaluate our progress. What I like about Scrum is that it’s all about getting things done and “controlling the chaos”. Each team member is held accountable for the commitments they make to the team. Everyone contributes to the team so it makes you feel good about your work while maximizing productivity. As time progresses and LevelTen evolves we will continually adjust, making the Scrum process our own. After all, we’re agile.