Online Gun Control

Online Gun Control

When it was discovered that the Virginia Tech shooter, Seung-Hui Cho, got one of his weapons from online dealer TheGunStore.com, you'd think some sort of restrictions would be enacted to keep people with a mental illness from purchasing guns over the internet, or just in general. You'd be wrong. It turns out the Northern Illinois University gunman, Steven Kazmierczak also used another site run by the same company, TopGlock.com, to purchase 9 mm Glock magazines and a holster. What's really interesting is that Kamierczack was able to obtain a firearm owner's license despite his history of mental illness that included a year's stay at Chicago's Threshold's Mary Hill House. He in turn used that license to legally purchase the shotgun and Glock used in his attack from a Champaign, Illinois dealer. In a statement published on the website, TopGlock owner Eric Thompson said that more restrictions should not be placed on the gun industry, in fact, he thinks that students and teachers should be licensed to carry guns and protect themselves. If the legislative record is any indication, he doesn't have to worry about that. The last substantive bill that tried to regulate online gun purchases was the Internet Gun Trafficking Act of 1999, which was promptly tabled, never to be heard from again. Some say because of the National Rifle Association and other gun rights groups' influence in Washington, it's almost impossible to pass even the most lenient gun control measures. Makes you wonder if this is what the nation's forefathers had in mind when they wrote the Second Amendment.