Goals and Requirements

Goals and Requirements

Each successful Web site development project begins with a goal in mind: for example, to gain exposure, to increase efficiency, or to do something better via the Internet. Coupled with this motivation is a set of perceived needs that the Web site could fulfill. Our initial task of scenario making is an informal activity specifying goals, functionality, audience, and conditions of use. Then, in a more formal process, we develop the requirements needed and measurable/attainable goals which can be used to track the effectiveness of our work. The following is a list of goals and requirements you should keep in mind when working on any Web site development project - no matter how big or small. General Goals General goals affect the overall operation of the site as a whole or relationships between entities. Here are some examples:

  • To provide consistent information for all users of the Web site
  • To provide website users with a communication tool that is effective for the tasks performed on the site
  • To promote activities and operations
User-Specific Goals User-specific goals meet the demands of individual audience members. We typically break these groups down from most to lest important audiences - primary, secondary, and tertiary users - then weigh tasks based on cost, time, and impact. Functional Requirements These describe the desired functions of the Web site. Not every type of user needs to perform every function. For example, customers need not, and should not, set the prices of products. We start by listing high-level requirements and building prototypes of the product. The advantage to prototyping is that it allows our customers to use and customize the products features and functionality early in the project and make changes as they see fit. It's that simple! Following these initial steps, along with continual improvements will increase efficiency, reduce cost and eliminate much of the risk involved in web development.